Summers Were Wetter in the Middle Ages Than They Are Today

ScienceDaily (Mar. 25, 2010) — The severe epidemic of plague known as the “Black Death” caused the death of a third of the European population in the 14th century. It is probable that the climatic conditions of the time were a contributory factor towards the disaster. “The late Middle Ages were unique from the point … Continue reading Summers Were Wetter in the Middle Ages Than They Are Today

C.S. Lewis’ Screwtape Letters: how it all began

The first of the Screwtape letters was published in The Guardian on 2 May 1941. Thirty more letters followed, one each week. Lewis was paid 2 per letter – but he would not accept the money. Instead, he sent the editor of The Guardian a list of widows and orphans to whom the 62 was … Continue reading C.S. Lewis’ Screwtape Letters: how it all began

The English: a people without a history?

by openDemocracy Author: Michael Collins Of all Britain’s peoples, the English have traditionally been the centrepiece of ‘British history’. Nonetheless, argues UCL historian Michael Collins, it is they who have the most to worry about when it comes to their sense of the past. According to A. J. P. Taylor, in 1934 Oxford University Press commissioned its History … Continue reading The English: a people without a history?

The Staffordshire Hoard: an Anglo-Saxon treasure unearthed

The Staffordshire Hoard is an unparalleled treasure find dating from Anglo-Saxon times. Both the quality and quantity of this unique treasure are remarkable. The story of how it came to be left in the Staffordshire soil is likely to be more remarkable still. The Hoard was first discovered in July 2009. The find is likely … Continue reading The Staffordshire Hoard: an Anglo-Saxon treasure unearthed

Historians Reassess Battle of Agincourt

Here is nn interesting article I found in the New York Times written by James Glanz and published on the 24th of October 2009. MAISONCELLE, France — The heavy clay-laced mud behind the cattle pen on Antoine Renault’s farm looks as treacherous as it must have been nearly 600 years ago, when King Henry V rode … Continue reading Historians Reassess Battle of Agincourt

The first Christmas card dates back to 1843

When London’s John Calcott Horsley invented the first Christmas card in 1843 as a favor to Henry Cole, neither man had any idea of the impact it would have in Britain and later in America. Even the early Christmas card manufacturers believed Christmas cards to be a vogue which would soon pass. They operated on … Continue reading The first Christmas card dates back to 1843

The King and his castle: how Henry II rebuilt his reputation

taken from the BBC History magazine Henry II spent vast sums making Dover Castle the mightiest fortress in the land. Yet, as John Gillinghamargues, he did so not to protect his realm but to save face following the murder of Thomas Becket On the evening of the fifth day of Christmas 1170, as the monks of … Continue reading The King and his castle: how Henry II rebuilt his reputation